Menu

Interactive Bar

Google Services

Search

Search

Translate

Translate

Log In

Chilthorne Domer Church School

We Stand Tall, Aim High and Love Learning

Maths

Below you will find lots of information about how we teach Maths in our school. 

Mathematics is a core subject within the National Curriculum but beyond that, maths forms the basis of our entire world and can be found in every context: from science and technology, through construction, the natural environment and of course, popping to the shops! Here at Chilthorne Domer Church School, we endeavour to ensure that all children leave each year group with a secure understanding of the age appropriate concepts and methods.

 

Listed below are useful documents related to the delivery of mathematics at Chilthorne Domer Church School and how best to support your child with their maths learning at home. If you have any further questions regarding your child's learning of mathematics then you can seek advice from your child's class teacher or the maths coordinator - Mrs Denley.

 

Key documents and information:

 

The calculation policy is a key document which outlines how children develop concepts within each year group and provides examples of how children should move from using concrete resources, through pictorial representations and finally developing fluency in abstract recording (Calculation Policy).

Year 4 Multiplication Check. It becomes compulsory that all Year 4 children will undertake a times tables check in June 2020. Please follow the link below to find out more but if you have any questions about this, then please do talk to Mrs Denley

Below are some interesting documents looking at some of the academic research that forms the basis of how we teach Maths at Chilthorne Domer.

How can I support my child at home?

 

We recognise that mathematics can often be viewed as something some of us are 'not very good at', that some of us don't have 'a maths brain' or that there are calculators, so why bother? 

 

These concepts can be big barriers to helping children developing their own mathematical knowledge and as adults, we need to be aware of the message that we share with children about maths. A good example would be the importance that is placed upon reading and writing. If as an adult we struggled with either of these key skills, then we would seek help to address our needs. Why should it be any different for our mathematical knowledge? 

 

Jo Boaler, a mathematics professor at Stanford University provides some useful clarity on how parent attitudes towards maths can impact on their children's own attitudes

To best ensure that concepts are firmly embedded, it is recognised that children should be using their maths skills as often as possible. Provided below are some age appropriate games that can help reinforce areas of maths learnt in school.
Top